Robert's Rules of Order
 

Top 10 Things a Booster Club Should Know About -

Bylaws:
A written document that defines the purpose of your group, its organizational structure, and the rules that govern the group. Bylaws should be customized for your group, published, and reviewed annually for revisions.

Amendments:
Formal changes to your bylaws.

Agenda:
A written list of items that will be covered during a meeting.

Minutes:
The written record of the business transacted at a meeting. Minutes should be kept for both Executive Board meetings and general Booster Club meetings.

Motion:
A formal proposal that the group take some specific action. Motions are voted upon by the group. An idea at a meeting will often result in the presentation of a motion. A motion is the way to resolve a dispute, debate, disagreement, or open issue. Any member in good standing can present a motion to the group. A motion can be tabled if the group needs more time before voting upon the motion. Tabling a motion suspends consideration until the group’s next formal meeting.

Seconding:
When a member presents a motion, their idea must be supported by another member. The supporting member “seconds” the motion to indicate their support. After a motion is seconded, it should be discussed by the group. A motion cannot be voted upon unless it is seconded.

Adjournment:
A formal way to end a meeting. At the appropriate time, a member moves to adjourn, another member seconds, and the rest of the members voice their agreement. The secretary records the adjournment time in the minutes.

Quorum:
The minimum number of members required to conduct business at a Booster Club meeting. Quorum is specified in the Booster Club’s bylaws.

Officers and Elections:
The bylaws should specify the elected officers of the Booster Club, their main duties, their term of office, and the procedures by which they are nominated and elected.

Robert’s Rules of Order:
Originally written by Major Henry M. Robert in 1876, it is the most common form of parliamentary procedure in the United States. It was designed to keep business moving, protect the rights of members, and ensure polite behavior in organizations. A Booster Club’s bylaws should specify that Robert’s Rules of Order is the group’s parliamentary authority. The complete version of RRO is hundreds of pages and covers every conceivable situation for the most complex organization. Many simplified versions the Rules have been published. Every Booster Club president should own at least one simplified version of Robert’s Rules.

The National Booster Club Training Council
“Providing Booster Club – Guidance – Education – Training & Support”

     
   
   
  Want a Copy of this?
If you would like us to send you a pdf version of this, complete the form below.

Items with a * are required.
REQUEST FORM
   
* Contact Type:
   
* Contact Person:
*First:
  *Last:
* Email:
   
       
Group Name:
* City:
 
* Zip/Postal Code:
 
 

Does your Booster Club/Group support a School or Non-School based program?
School
Non School

 
If you have spoken to one of the NBCTC representatives, please take a moment to indicate which representative. Taking the time to do so will make it easier for us to provide you with the proper assistance in the future.
   
  Were you referred by a NBCTC representative?
Yes
No

 
NBCTC Representative Name: